The beginning of the second novel

Two very important things happened today in the world of NaNoWriMo.

First, I finished the first novel. It came in at 78,787 words and ended with a plot element that I never would have thought of earlier. Who knew that the safety pin my main character used for her skirt that morning would save all the worlds in the end? I certainly didn’t, but when I was trying to figure out what she could use and how she could get it, that came to mind. The safety pin’s appearance in my mind is one of the things I love about being a writer.

I also started the second novel. When I finished the first novel, I had nothing in mind with the second novel, but after poking around the adoption society forum at the NaNoWriMo site for a few minutes, particularly the “Adopt a What If” thread, one of them in particular struck me. “What if your character was an advisor to a god?”

This got me thinking. What if an atheist served as an advisor to God? Better yet, what if this atheist served as an advisor to God while God tried to improve her public image to humans?

That got the ball rolling for my second novel. I’m over 6000 words into the second novel, giving me my second ten thousand word day of the month so far. Reaching 100,000 words by the halfway point will be easy at this rate.

3 thoughts on “The beginning of the second novel

  1. “This got me thinking. What if an atheist served as an advisor to God? Better yet, what if this atheist served as an advisor to God while God tried to improve her public image to humans?”

    Better yet, what if you abandon this stupid idea? If this is what you get from “thinking,” think less.

    • @Istvan Funny, I like to encourage people who don’t think that often to think more instead of less. Maybe they’ll get a grasp of first order logic and basic statistics this way. It’s a dangerous pastime, I know, but it’s one that should be exercised often. If this novel is your idea of stupidity, then I look forward to seeing your novel out on shelves on December first since it’s obviously perfect and won’t need any revising.

  2. Pingback: Does every book need a message? | Sushi Writes About Things

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.