What I’m Reading, September 2016

Another month, another review post. This will probably be my last post until the end of the year since I stop almost all reading in October and November thanks to NaNoWriMo. However, I do plan on continuing to run, and I listen to audiobooks while running, so we shall see. Onward!

The Filter Bubble: What the Internet is Hiding From You by Eli Pariser: I listened to this book. Ever notice how ads seem to be targeted for you, even if those targeted ads are terrible? (I’m looking at you, Tr*mp ads.) Ever notice how you see the same content from the same people on Facebook? We’re well into the era of digital personalization. This sounds like a good thing in theory–we’re more likely to find what we’re interested in. But in practice, seeing only stuff we like only reinforces our own beliefs, leaving fewer opportunities to expand our horizons. That’s the argument Eli Pariser makes in this book, and it’s a strong one, even if some of the examples are a little dated now. He goes back and explains the history of online giants like Google and Amazon and Netflix, showing how they started using personalization and accidentally created these filter bubbles in the process. If you’re interested in online privacy at all, you should read this book. (4 out of 5 data points)

Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books by Michael Dirda: I listened to this book, a light-hearted essay collection about books and authors and the bookish life. Each essay is meant to be read separately, not binge-read, although I violated this rule throughout most of this collection. While some of these essays are definitely better than others, that’s the nature of collections like these: some will be to your taste, others won’t, and still others may veer from the topic altogether. Still, the essays reflected some eclectic tastes that I never would have given a second thought to otherwise, which made for a fun read… er, listen. But even better than the essays themselves is the narrator of the audiobook, John Lescault. His voice is so calming and soothing that my roommates asked whose voice that was while I was listening and getting ready to go out. (4 out of 5 vintage books)

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi: This memoir I was worried about the rain while running and finishing it. I should have been worried about my face turning into a faucet. Kalanithi was a newly trained neurosurgeon diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer–despite having never smoked–and he wrote this book while going through cancer treatment. What makes life worth living? What should he do with whatever years he had left, whether that was one or ten? It made me think of my own potential answers to these questions, knowing that these answers wouldn’t be definite unless I were in those shoes. Kalanithi really did write like he was running out of time. (4 out of 5 deep questions)

Wikiworld by Paul Di Filippo: This short story collection is… all right. While some of the stories are all right, none of them really stood out to me. I enjoyed some of the futuristic envisionings, but some of them were downright confusing. This year, at least, it says somehting when a book takes me three weeks to finish. (3 out of 5 futuristic visions)

Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family by Amy Ellis Nutt: I listened to this book, which is the story of the Maines family–Wayne, Kelly, and identical twins Jonas and Nicole. There’s one thing: Nicole is trans. This book tells the story of Nicole’s story and transition and how the family dealt with various challenges, from Nicole’s schoolmates accepting her (they did for the most part) to presenting as female every day to the family’s activism in trans rights. Simultaneously heartwarming and heartbreaking, the story follows all four family members and their stories. I wish we had heard more from Nicole herself, but all in all, this book does a great job of telling one family’s story and how they grew closer, despite everything that could have torn them apart. (5 out of 5 transitions)

For Better: The Science of a Good Marriage by Tara Parker-Pope: I listened to this book, which takes a look at what makes a good marriage. Well, in theory. In practice, I already knew a lot of this stuff, such as how couples argue and balance the chores. While some of the info was interesting. There are also quizzes throughout the book to reinforce what you’ve already read. While these are obviously designed for couples. I’d be interested in reading a related book with more info on LGBT+ couples post-marriage equality. This book confirms one thing: If I’m getting married, I’m only doing it once. (3 out of 5 vows)

Characters and Viewpoint by Orson Scott Card: This is part of the Elements of Fiction Writing Series, and I read it as an attempt to brainstorm for NaNo. (And okay, so I could give it back to a friend I’m seeing later today.) This book discusses topics from creating characters to point of view to rounding out characters, and it’s really helpful no matter what stage of character development you’re in. Shame this book wasn’t written before first person present was everywhere; I’d be interested to know what Card thinks of that. If you have trouble creating believable characters or even just want a refresher, this is a good book to pick up. (4 out of 5 characters)

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande: I listened to this book, which discusses the end of life and what we can do to make the last few years of life better than just sitting around and waiting to die. The book is part memoir and interviews, part history on caring for the elderly. Personally I found the history of elder care more interesting than the memoir and interviews, in part because it gave the book the context it needed to succeed. My grandmother spent the last year of her life in a nursing home after breaking her hip and developing worsening Alzheimer’s, so this book hit particularly close to home. If you’re interested in elder care at all, read this book. (4 out of 5 living assistants)

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